Last Week in Tech Policy #51: Internet Platforms and Violent Content

(by Kristine Roach, Colorado Law 2L)

After the Unite the Right rally and associated violence in Charlottesville, NC on the weekend of Aug 11th, internet platforms and domain name providers responded by taking down content from The Daily Stormer, a neo-Nazi website that had encouraged some of the weekend’s events, raising a complicated debate over the responsibility that online platforms bear for hate speech, harassment, and violence, the concentration of power online, and free speech.

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Last Week in Tech Law & Policy, Vol. 39: First Amendment Protection For Discriminatory Ads?

(by Andi Wilt, Colorado Law 3L)

When is the last time you Googled someone’s name? There are many reasons why you might have done that. You could have been trying to learn more about someone who was about to interview you for a position, or maybe you were about to interview them, or even deciding whom you were going to interview in the first place. An applicant’s online presence is important to many employers, as one source indicates that 90% of executive recruiters say they do online research on applicants; up to 70% of employers who have used LinkedIn say they have decided not to hire someone based on something they learn about the applicant online.

So what’s the problem with a little online research about a person? Professor Latanya Sweeney found that a Google search for a black identifying name is 25 percent more likely to be accompanied by an arrest-related ad. Professor Sweeney explored the connection between “[b]lack-identifying” and “[w]hite-identifying” first names, which are “those for which a significant number of people have the name and the frequency is sufficiently higher in one race than another.” Continue reading “Last Week in Tech Law & Policy, Vol. 39: First Amendment Protection For Discriminatory Ads?”