Municipal Drone Policy

TLPC student attorneys and Colorado Law 2Ls Kristine Roach, Trey Reed, and Jay Gurney recently finalized a white paper on municipal drone policy. The paper outlines some of the many drone applications for hobbyists, businesses, researchers and governments, while considering disruption and intrusion concerns.

Given these competing concerns and interests, the paper outlines different approaches to municipal drone policies and regulations, including the prospect of federal preemption. The paper also analyzes 4th Amendment limitations on municipal drone surveillance and open records requirements implicated by municipal drone use. While the analysis is most pertinent to Boulder, the drone policy considerations are intended to be applicable to municipalities across the United States.

Our thanks to Prof. Deborah Cantrell, Prof. Ann England, Prof. Margot Kaminski, Tom Carr, Boulder City Attorney, Julia Richman, Boulder Chief Information and Analytics Officer, and Cory Dixon, IRISS Chief Technologist for their help in the development of this paper.

Last Week in Tech Law & Policy Vol. 6: Self-Driven Tech

(by James Frazier, Student Attorney)

Planes, automobiles, and artificial intelligence. This week, the FAA released new rules regulating drones, Apple and Sony threw their hats into the autonomous automobile arena, and Great Britain announced that it will release new rules governing driverless car testing in the UK. Mike Hean, a Swiss entrepreneur, suggested that driverless cars should be programed with advanced artificial intelligence that would allow an Uber-style ride sharing app. Indeed, Hean believes that driverless car should be able to own themselves, and even earn their own income. Tying these threads together, MIT’s Tech Review released an article this week outlining some contemporary concerns about artificial intelligence.

Continue reading “Last Week in Tech Law & Policy Vol. 6: Self-Driven Tech”