Last Week in Tech Policy #54: Challenges of Apprehending and Combating Cybercriminals

(by Jordan Demo, Colorado Law 2L)

The recent Equifax breach affecting approximately 143 million people has left many to call for justice—but justice for whom? After-the-fact investigations have tended to focus on whether the targeted entities took sufficient or reasonable measures to protect their systems. But what is the process for bringing attackers to justice? How are attackers who take the personal information of companies and individuals held accountable? What can be done to help deter this kind of behavior?

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Last Week in Tech Policy #52: Cyberbullying

(by Angel Antkers, Colorado Law 2L)

Can you imagine a complete invasion of your privacy? Nude images intended only for a significant other’s eyes can be leaked online, as Robert Kardashian did earlier this year with pictures of his ex-fiance Blac Chyna,  Several other celebrities have encountered their own intimate images hacked and shown online.

Revenge porn is not the only form of online harassment. Online figures, such as game developers Brianna Wu and Zoe Quinn and media critic Anita Sarkeesian, have been targeted during the Gamergate controversy with posts containing personal information, like their social security numbers and addresses, and even threats of assault, rape, and murder. These types of threads have even included the  threat of a mass shooting at a university, which prevented Sarkeesian from delivering a presentation, as well as threats that forced Sarkeesian to flee her own home. Despite FBI opening an investigation regarding the Gamergate threats against Wu and Sarkeesian, it was eventually closed.

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Last Week in Tech Policy #48: Playpen and Government Hacking

(by Sergey Frolov, University of Colorado Computer Science Ph.D candidate)

In the U.S., it is illegal to produce, distribute, and possess child pornography. Playpen is a now-defunct child pornography website. The FBI managed to trace the site’s operators, then obtained a warrant and seized the web server on which the site ran.

However, instead of shutting the server down immediately, the FBI continued to operate Playpen for an additional 13 days. During that time, according to the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the FBI sent malware to visitors to the site in order to identify and prosecute them for possession of child pornography.

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Last Week in Tech Law & Policy, Vol. 34: Algorithm Bias, Discrimination, and the Law

(By Max Brennan, Colorado Law 2L)

This week’s blog post examines the concept of algorithm bias. It begins with a definition of algorithm bias, turning to  its interactions with the law, some real-world examples of bias, and ends with considerations for future legal treatment of algorithm bias.

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Last Week in Tech Law & Policy, Vol. 32: Is government hacking a “search” under the Fourth Amendment?

(by Kiki Council, Colorado Law 3L)

Last week’s blog post concerned the ramifications of sponsored and compelled government hacking with the use of backdoor encryption. This week’s post concerns how government hacks of computers using the Tor browser, and whether those hacks are considered a “search” under the Fourth Amendment.

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