International Copyright Law and Accessibility

(by Colorado Law 3Ls Gabrielle Daley, Luke Ewing, and Lindsey Knapton)

Over the past two years the Samuelson-Glushko Technology Law and Policy Clinic (TLPC) has worked with Professor Caroline Ncube of the University of Cape Town and representatives of member states  of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) to prepare a study on the implications of copyright law for people with disabilities around the world.

The 35th Session of WIPO’s Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights (SCCR) is fast approaching. This November 13-17, representatives from member states and non-governmental organizations from around the world will gather in Geneva, Switzerland to discuss international copyright policy. During this meeting, our team will present the findings of the study we’ve spent the better part of the last year preparing. As the November meeting nears, this post discusses the work we’ve done to date.
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Last Week in Tech Policy #58: An Artificial You

In 2016, a group from Niessner Lab in Germany published a groundbreaking achievement in the world of computer facial manipulation. Their new technology, called Face2Face, captures one person’s facial expressions as they talk into a webcam and maps those facial expressions directly onto a separate individual’s face in real-time. In essence, this means that you can take a video of anyone and make their face show any expression you’d like. For example, in a demonstration video, footage of Vladimir Putin giving a serious speech becomes a video of him smiling, then frowning, with eyebrows up and then down.

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Last Week in Tech Policy #57: Medjacking

(by Justin Manusov, Colorado Law 3L)

Hacking. Tapping. Cracking. Medjacking.

In the TV show Homeland episode Broken Hearts, a CIA informant  is forced to retrieve a serial number that corresponds to the American Vice President’s pacemaker. A terrorist gains access to the VP’s pacemaker, accelerates his heartbeat and induces a heart attack.

Former Vice President Dick Cheney revealed that when he had a device implanted to regulate his heartbeat in 2007, he had his doctors disable its wireless capabilities to prevent a possible assassination attempt.

The health IT community is beginning to take medjacking seriously.

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Last Week in Tech Policy #56: LEDs Talk About Lights!

(By Sophia Galleher, Colorado Law 2L)

Some people enter Newark Airport and look up. The lights, like many LEDs, seem almost too crisp—too bright. But most travelers, perhaps worried about missing a connection or losing a wayward child in the terminal, rush through the airport without raising a brow; the LEDs lights, twinkling down from their chic, architectural fixtures, don’t really beg much thought. They seem innocuous enough.

But just know, the next time you walk through Newark Airport, that those lights are watching you.

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Last Week in Tech Policy #55: CRISPR Possibilities and Concerns

(by Trey Reed, Colorado Law 2L)

CRISPR Cas9, a gene editing software, is increasingly being used by researchers to modify the genetic code of organisms. Recently, scientists from Spain have found the genetic sequence that produces most of the gluten in wheat. They removed this sequence and produced wheat with 85% reduced gluten toxicity. In the United Kingdom, scientists have found a gene (OCT4) that, if absent, causes the embryo to fail to implant correctly which leads to a miscarriage in the early stages of pregnancy. By ensuring that this gene is present, doctors can help in vitro fertilization pregnancies survive. Scientists in the United States received permission to begin testing on human embryos this past July.

From taking the gluten out of wheat, to preventing miscarriages, the possibilities are almost endless. However, while the possibilities are staggering, the ethical considerations are also large.

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