Reexamination of FCC Spectrum Enforcement and Dispute Resolution Mechanism

The FCC’s leadership in spectrum management has led to increased spectrum accessibility, more flexibility in how licensees and unlicensed users utilize the spectrum, and a greater reliance on market-type mechanisms. These developments each reflect a welcome migration away from a command and control-type approach to managing the spectral resource. In this Comment, the TLPC encourages the FCC to take the next step in spectrum management by reexamining existing spectrum enforcement mechanisms. Speedy and predictable ways to enforce rights are an important dimension of a well-functioning market. There is reason to question whether existing enforcement mechanisms are sufficient given wireless regulatory and market trends. In Spring 2011, Colorado Law’s TLPC filed a Reply Comment under the FCC’s Dynamic Spectrum Notice of Inquiry (NOI). The TLPC’s filing explains why the FCC should reexamine its existing enforcement and dispute resolution mechanisms in order to adapt to an environment where more intensive and dynamic spectrum activity is likely to increase the frequency of spectrum rights disputes.

University of Colorado Reply Comment ET Docket No. 10-237

Social Media for Emergency Communications (March 2011)

by Meg Panzer

This comment, submitted to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), analyzes how consumers have used social media during an emergency, how consumers will expect to use social media for emergency purposes in the future, and to what extent public safety jurisdictions might employ social media tools as a way to interact with the public.  This filing requests that the FCC encourage social media use as part of emergency response and provide guidance to jurisdictions that wish to employ social media tools during a crisis.

Comments of Samuelson-Glushko Technology Law and Policy Clinic

Guide to Regulatory Advocacy In Technology Policy (Jan. 2010)

Technology Regulatory Advocacy

Learning the craft of regulatory advocacy remains largely an apprenticeship experience.  Few resources or formal courses focus on navigating the regulatory process as it relates to technology policy.    The existing compilation document is a small contribution toward creation of a helpful “how to” resource concerning technology advocacy.

In January 2010, members of the Cybertelecom list were asked if they knew of “an excellent text or starter set of materials concerning the ‘how to’ advocacy aspects of technology law policy?”  It took the group just a week and fifty two responses to collectively say, “no.”  Happily, the collective answer went further.  Members of the list set about helping fill what appears to be at least a partial literature gap.  This resulted a set of ideas which makes progress toward creation of a document which provides guidance to newcomers concerning technology policy advocacy.

This document is an open source creature.  Input and additions are welcome.   As is, the document is a helpful checklist of considerations within a useful conceptual framework.  It remains, however, two dimensional for those who have not done it before.  Concrete stories and illustrations from technology policy  would be particularly helpful and welcome. This document will be updated on a monthly basis through Colorado Law’s Samuelson-Glushko Technology Law & Policy Clinic.