Last Week in Tech Policy #48: Playpen and Government Hacking

(by Sergey Frolov, University of Colorado Computer Science Ph.D candidate)

In the U.S., it is illegal to produce, distribute, and possess child pornography. Playpen is a now-defunct child pornography website. The FBI managed to trace the site’s operators, then obtained a warrant and seized the web server on which the site ran.

However, instead of shutting the server down immediately, the FBI continued to operate Playpen for an additional 13 days. During that time, according to the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the FBI sent malware to visitors to the site in order to identify and prosecute them for possession of child pornography.

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Last Week in Tech Law & Policy, Vol. 34: Algorithm Bias, Discrimination, and the Law

(By Max Brennan, Colorado Law 2L)

This week’s blog post examines the concept of algorithm bias. It begins with a definition of algorithm bias, turning to  its interactions with the law, some real-world examples of bias, and ends with considerations for future legal treatment of algorithm bias.

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Last Week in Tech Law & Policy, Vol. 32: Is government hacking a “search” under the Fourth Amendment?

(by Kiki Council, Colorado Law 3L)

Last week’s blog post concerned the ramifications of sponsored and compelled government hacking with the use of backdoor encryption. This week’s post concerns how government hacks of computers using the Tor browser, and whether those hacks are considered a “search” under the Fourth Amendment.

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