TLPC Students Organize Screening and Panel for the Documentary The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz

(by Stephanie Vu, Colorado Law 3L, and Stefan Tschimben, Interdiscliplinary Telecom Program student)

On October 20th, the TLPC and the ATLAS Institute at the University of Colorado held a screening and panel discussion of the documentary The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz. The documentary follows the life and death of Internet activist and programing prodigy Aaron Swartz. Aaron played a part in the creation of web feed format RSS (Really Simple Syndication) and was a co-founder of Reddit. Aaron was best known to some for his political activism against the Stop Online Piracy Act and his crusade for the open access to information. This crusade led to a two-year legal battle and ultimately his death at age 26. The documentary explores the relationship between civil liberties and technology and gives a heartfelt account of a young man whose life work has benefited almost everyone who has ever used the internet.

According to Professor Blake Reid, “Aaron’s life and death have left an indelible mark on public policy surrounding technology, digital civil liberties, and access to knowledge. The Internet’s Own Boy is a window into Aaron’s legacy through which anyone interested in the future of our democracy in an information age should take a careful and thoughtful look.”

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TLPC team wins CU Fall Technology Policy Challenge

Congratulations to the winners of the 2014 CU Fall Technology Policy Challenge! The winning team consisted of four TLPC members. From left to right: Molly McClurg (Colorado Law 2L), Amber Williams (Colorado Law 3L), Stefan Tschimben (CU Interdisciplinary Telecommunications Program student), and Vickie Stubbs (ATLAS Institute student).

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TLPC files DMCA exemption for good faith security research

The TLPC continued its efforts in the Copyright Office’s triennial review last week by filing a petition for exemption from the anti-circumvention measures in Section 1201 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) for circumventing technological protection measures (TPMs) to perform good faith security research. The TLPC filed the petition, drafted by student attorneys Chris Meier, Amber Williams, and Bridgett Murphy on behalf of  Dr. Matthew Green, Assistant Research Professor at the Johns Hopkins Information Security Institute.

TLPC files DMCA exemption renewal petition for ebook accessibility

Last week, TLPC student attorneys Mel Jensen and Alex Koral filed an initial petition with the Copyright Office seeking to renew an exemption for people who are blind, visually impaired, or print disabled to  read ebooks on equal terms by circumventing technological protection measures (TPMs) on ebooks that interfere with adaptive technologies, such as text-to-speech functions and refreshable Braille displays. The TLPC filed the petition in partnership with the American Foundation for the Blind and the American Council of the Blind as part of the U.S. Copyright Office’s triennial review of exemptions from the anti-circumvention measures in section 1201 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA).